Saturday, November 9, 2013

Michele Gorman's New Novella

I’m so excited that my novella, Christmas Carol, launches globally this week! But since I’ve had a complete scheduling fail, I'm hoping to get by with a little help from my friends :-) 

We've accidentally chosen this Thursday, 48 hours before my wedding, for the official launch (I know, I know), and with 120 people coming from all corners of the world tomorrow, I'm afraid I might not have as much time as I'd like to be on FB/twitter.
If you’ve got a moment to post a quick Facebook or twitter link to Christmas Carol any time this week, or just RT/share a post, that’d be great. 

Thursday, November 7, 2013

How Do You Move On From Loss of a Loved One?



Thank you to Penguin and Netgalleyfor this copy of Blackberry Winter.  I was given this in exchange for an honest review.  Sarah Jio has another great story!


Synopsis:
Vera and Claire have one thing in common they have both lost children.   One day in the present Claire a reporter is asked to write a story for the Seattle Herald about the last Blackberry Winter in 1933.  There was one major event where a child went missing.   While Claire investigates this story she is also dealing with a husband who is not really present in her life.  We also meet Vera the mother of the missing boy back in 1933.  Part of this story is told by Vera as she shares what happened during that winter.  What happened to Vera?  What happened to the little boy?  Will finding the answers help Claire to move on?


My Thoughts:

I liked this story and wanted to see how it turned out.   I had a hard time liking the character of Claire initially.  The author did a great job conveying her sadness to the readers.   I also was heartbroken for Vera and her loss.   The plot was what got most of my interest.  I wasn’t quite sure how it would turn out.   Ms. Jio is developing into quite a storyteller. 

I have not experienced loss like both these mothers did.  I hope to know what it is like to have a family in my future.   I do understand fighting for what is right and fighting for the right to tell a story that needs to be told. One aspect that is true about our culture is the class divide between the wealthy and the poor.  These distinctions are not as true today as they were in the past. 

Rating:

4.25/5

Please visit Sarah on her Facebook page, Twitter, and her Website.

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Welcome to Sullivan’s Island!



Sullivan’s Island is the treasure of the low country.  In Return to Sullivan’s Island Beth Hays makes a return to this treasured island.  Her family has asked her for a
commitment for a year. 


Synopsis:

Is this a commitment that she wants?  Beth goes despite obligation to family.  Her mother Susan is leaving to go to France and teach at the University.  Her Aunt Maggie is going to California with her family.  So someone must stay at the house!    Her Aunt Sophie suggests for her to go and get a job, and use the experience to write her book.  One job is as a freelance journalist for the local paper.  Beth’s first assignment is the destruction of a favorite landmark and the new construction project.  She is worried that this project goes against the rich history of Sullivan’s Island.  Max Mitchell is the developer and sparks Beth’s interest.  What will this relationship go anywhere?  What will happen to Beth’s family?   Will they forgive her for her choices?


My Thoughts:

This is my first Dorothea Benton Frank novel.  I can tell you that I am ready for the next one.  I listened to this novel as an audiobook.  Robin Miles is an excellent reader/narrator.  I hope that she is part of more of Dorothea’s novels.   I did come into this series in the second book.  I felt that I might have missed a little of the history of the Hamilton family. 

The author’s style of writing brings the reader in and makes them comfortable.  She communicated an obvious love for the low country.   The author paints a vivid picture of what is it like to be at Sullivan’s Island.    This novel is rich in culture and history of the south.

Rating:

4.75/5

Please visit Dorothea Benton Frank on her Facebook page, Twitter, and her Website.